Saturday, July 31

Some Dos and Don’ts of Writing for Advocacy, Part 2: Writing Letters to Elected Officials by Tracy Hahn-Burkett

You can call state and regional authorities for a follow-up conversation, too.

Yes, sometimes MOCs go on main Congressional Delegation visits to various areas or take getaways during recess, however numerous recess durations are dedicated to work time in their districts. You can call state and regional officials for a follow-up conversation, too.

They dont vote on state or regional matters; thats what state senators, state agents, and regional authorities do. That being stated, elected officials can often exercise a persuasive impact outside their actual jurisdiction. Chosen authorities may read those, but so do other political decision-makers: citizens.

They dont vote on state or regional matters; thats what state senators, state representatives, and local authorities do. That being stated, chosen authorities can often exercise a persuasive impact outside their actual jurisdiction. The occasional exception to this guideline is in some local or state efforts where advocacy leaders are coordinating drives to flood state leadership or committee workplaces with phone calls.

Understand that, for example, a MOC can get thousands of letters, emails and phone calls per week. If your congressperson tried to address each letter personally, it would be the only thing they did– and they still wouldnt be able to finish the job.

DONT compose to elected agents who dont represent you. If youre writing to an elected agent in somebody elses district, you have no impact there, and, to be honest, those representatives simply arent interested in your point of view. The periodic exception to this rule is in some local or state efforts where advocacy leaders are collaborating drives to flood state leadership or committee offices with phone calls.

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